If you continue to use this site we will assume that you are happy with it. b.) SONNET 2 When forty winters shall beseige thy brow, And dig deep trenches in thy beauty's field, Thy youth's proud livery, so gazed on now, Will be a tatter'd weed, of small worth held: No love, my love, that thou mayst true love call; All mine was thine, before thou hadst this more. mistress (lines1,5,6). In order to forgive the youth for his actions, the poet places himself in both the youth's position and that of the mistress. Forgiveness of betrayal is the theme. The poem is made up of three quatrains, or sets of four lines, and one concluding couplet, or set of two rhyming lines. Then if for my love thou my love receivest. Take all my loves, my love, yea take them all; What hast thou then more than thou hadst before? The images in the YouTube video are from an original 1609 edition of Shake-speares Sonnets held by the British Library. Scritti probabilmente fra il 1595 e i primi anni del 1600, i Sonetti di Shakespeare costituiscono uno dei grandi vertici della letteratura d’amore di tutti i tempi, rappresentano anche un momento centrale della produzione letteraria del grande drammaturgo inglese. the youth (lines1,3). Analysis of Shakespeare's Boyce, Charles.     Lascivious grace, in whom all ill well shows. Shakespeare's Sonnets . Sonnet 40. No love, my love, that thou mayst true love call – All … By wilful taste of what thyself refusest. Take all my loves, my love, yea, take them all, What hast thou then more than thou hadst before? To bear love’s wrong than hate’s known injury. I do forgive thy robb’ry, gentle thief. Take all my loves, my love, yea take them all; What hast thou then more than thou hadst before? “What hast thou then more than thou hadst before?” He tells him he has never known real love “No love, my love,” and that the poets own love was his “All mine was thine” before the friend found this new love “before thou hadst this more”, The poet says, instead of loving him, “if for my love” he chooses to make love to the person the poet loves,” my love receivest” then he can’t really blame the friend “I cannot blame thee” who is actually taking advantage of him, “my love thou usest.” he tells the friend to blame himself, “yet be blamed,” if he lies to himself “thou thyself deceivest” and also makes love to another knowingly “wilful taste” while refusing the poets love “what thyself refusest.”, The poet forgives him calling him a gentle thief for stealing “forgive thy robb’ry,” the last thing he has “thou steal thee all my poverty;” and yet every lover knows “yet love knows” how sad it is “greater grief” to be hurt by someone whom you love “bear love’s wrong” rather than an enemy’s hateful injury “hate’s known injury.”. I sonetti in Italiano ed in originale. Home Shakespeare's Sonnets E-Text: Sonnet 40 E-Text Shakespeare's Sonnets Sonnet 40. Translation of 'Sonnet 40' by William Shakespeare from English to Turkish 5 See de Grazia, "The Scandal of Shakespeare's Sonnets," Shakespeare Survey 46 (1993): 35-49, esp. The sonnet seems to be placed deliberately at this point, as number 60, to coincide with the 60 minutes of the hour, just as No.12 marks the twelve hours of the day. He tells his friend that even in his lustful nature he appears gracious Lascivious grace, in whom all ill well shows, and though he kills the poet emotionally, Kill me with spites; they should not be enemies we must not be foes. If the dull substance of my flesh were thought. Print. While William Shakespeare’s reputation is based primarily on his plays, he became famous first as a poet. Take all my loves, my love, yea take them all; all my loves - the sonnet plays on the various meanings of love. Actually understand Shakespeare's Sonnets Sonnet 40. I cannot blame thee for my love thou usest; But yet be blamed if thou this self deceivest. XL. Shakespeare’s Sonnets Sonnet 127 Synopsis: The poet defends his love of a mistress who does not meet the conventional standard of beauty by claiming that her dark eyes and hair (and, perhaps, dark skin) are the new standard. Sonnet 40 begins a three-sonnet sequence in which the poet shares his possessions and his mistress with the youth, although it is not until Sonnet 41 that he directly mentions their liaison. Continue reading for complete analysis and meaning in the modern text. sister projects: Wikipedia article, Wikidata item. Sonnet 18: Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? Feeds on the rarities of nature’s truth, The whole sonnet is a metaphor because Shakespeare is writing about getting older without And nothing stands but for his scythe to mow. a.) New York: Roundtable Press, Inc., 1990. Sonnet 42 is the final set of three sonnets known as the betrayal sonnets (40, 41, 42) that address the fair youth's transgression against the poet: stealing his mistress. Sonnet 129: The expense of spirit in a waste of shame. Take all my loves, my love, yea, take them all, What hast thou then more than thou hadst before? Sonnet 44.     Kill me with spites, yet we must not be foes. ← Sonnet 39 Shakespeare's Sonnets (1883) (1883) by William Shakespeare , edited by William J. Rolfe ... Or return to the William Shakespeare facts home page and explore some of the other material we have compiled for your interest, entertainment or education. In this poem I believe that "love" has many different meanings written into it ,harsh, s oft, and weakness. Sonnet 40 is complex with mixed interpretation by Shakespearean excerpts the common accepted theme is infidelity and pain. For other versions of this work, see Sonnet 40 (Shakespeare). Sonnet Analysis Shakespeare Sonnet 40, Take all my loves, my love; yea, take them all. Shakespeare Sonnet 40 (Original Text) In Sonnet 40, Shakespeare conveys the same message as in some of his other sonnets, love. Shakespeare is telling his friend to take all his loves “Take all my loves, my love , yea, take them all.” He asks him what does he have now that he never had before. actually saying that. Comments about Sonnet 40: Take All My Loves, My Love, Yea, Take Them All by William Shakespeare Ramesh T A (2/17/2017 1:25:00 PM) It is a great grief to bear love's wrong but not the injury of hate and let not lovers become foes says Shakespeare as a significant message here! To the reader or interpreter, Sonnet 40 may allow one to ponder about what the meaning of love is. No love, my love, that thou mayst true love call, All mine was thine, before thou hadst this more. Shakespeare A to Z. Shakespeare Sonnets » Shakespeare’s Sonnet #40: “Take all my loves, ... Reading of Sonnet 40. Click on video to play. This same imagery is used in Sonnet 40, when the speaker says, "I do forgive thy robbery, gentle thief." The use of the word "love" may be confusing to readers, for "love" in this sonnet means at least three different things. Classic and contemporary love poems to share. Williams Shakespeare's poem, “Sonnet 40: Take All My Loves, My Love, Yea, Take Them All” is also one that also expresses passionate love. Everyone knows how shallow and guilt-producing lust is but very few men can avoid it. This feature is not available right now. Then if for my love thou my love receivest, Sonnet 129 is an interesting take on the imperative force of lust, but its ultimate shallowness. With the partial exception of the Sonnets (1609), quarried since the early 19th century for autobiographical secrets allegedly encoded in them, the nondramatic writings have traditionally been pushed... Take all my loves, my love, yea, take them all: What hast thou then more than thou hadst before? Sonnet 41 implies that it is easy for the speaker to forgive the fair lord his betrayal, since it is the mistress that "woos," tempted by the fair lord's beauty just as the speaker admires it. No love, my love, that thou mayst true love call—. Folger Shakespeare Library. This is a short summary of Shakespeare sonnet 40. Please try again later. This offense was referred to in Sonnets 33–35, most obviously in Sonnet 35, in which the fair youth is called a "sweet thief." There is even a pun included in line 2, (hour minutes) so that the reader need not lose his/her bearings in the sequence. Sonnet 40: Take all my loves, my love, yea, take them all By William Shakespeare About this Poet While William Shakespeare’s reputation is based primarily on his plays, he became famous first as a poet. For the complete list of 154 sonnets, check the collection of Shakespeare Sonnets with analysis. 40-41. One of the 154 sonnets by Shakespeare from the collection Shakespeare's Sonnets (1609). Continue reading for complete analysis and meaning in the modern text. Sonnet 19: Devouring Time, blunt thou the lion's paws. Shakespeare's Sonnet 40 is one of the sequence addressed to a well-born, handsome young man to whom the speaker is devoted. Submit your Email Now. I forgive you, but love’s deception is worse than straightforward hatred. In R. G. White (Ed. Take all my loves, my love, yea, take them all: What hast thou then more than thou hadst before? Sonnet 40 by William Shakespeare read by Sir John Gielgud. Commentary 1. Essential Tips to get success with English Literature. 1 – 20 ¦ 21 – 40 … In this piece, the speaker of the poem is speaking to a charming man with whom they’re fond of. 6 Hilton Landry, Interpretations in Shakespeare … This sonnet affirms Shakespeare's love for his friend, at the same time expressing his grievance against the friend. Summary. Shakespeare Sonnets: Summary & Analysis 154 sonnets with translation, Shakespeare Sonnet 40, Take all my loves, my love; yea, take them all. He personifies time to tell Shakespeare’s friend has committed adultery by having an affair with the poets love, sweetheart or wife. Sonnet 40 40. Year Published: 1609 Language: English Country of Origin: England Source: Shakespeare, W. The sonnets. For the complete list of 154 sonnets, check the collection of Shakespeare Sonnets with analysis. In this poem, as in the others in this part of the sequence, the speaker expresses resentment of his beloved's power over him. c.) the experience of loving, love per se, as in lines 3, 11, or as in phrases such as Love is too young to know what conscience is.Sonn 151. d.) the specific love of the speaker for the youth (line 5). We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. Sonnet 40 'Take all my loves, my love, yea, take them all' Why don’t you just take away all the love I have? Below… Sonnet 40 by William Shakespeare. It is one of only thirteen copies in existence. Read every line of Shakespeare’s original text alongside a modern English translation. Song of the Witches: “Double, double toil and trouble”, Sonnet 15: When I consider everything that grows. It’s a poem about ageing, and about the benefits of having children – continuing the argument begun in the previous sonnet. Structure of Sonnet 40 ‘Sonnet 40’ by William Shakespeare is a fourteen-line sonnet that is structured in the form known as a “Shakespearean” or English sonnet. In the sonnet's first four lines, the poet mildly accuses the young man of committing small sins, but he then goes on to accept the youth's actions given his age and beauty. This is a short summary of Shakespeare sonnet 40. Shakespeare shows how lust brings out the very worst in people and the extremes they will go to. A critical reading of a Shakespeare sonnet The Shakespeare sonnet that begins ‘When forty winters shall besiege thy brow’ is sonnet 2 of 154, and the second in a series of ‘Procreation Sonnets’. No love, my love, that thou mayst true love call; All mine was thine, before thou hadst this more. Then, if for my love, thou my love receivest, I cannot blame thee, for my love thou usest; But yet be blam’d, if thou thy self deceivest By wilful taste of what thyself refusest. Then, if for my love, thou my love receivest, The text and analysis of Shakespeare's sonnet 40. All mine was thine before thou hadst this more.